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Movements in World Cinema 2

{ "courseDescription": "This course surveys the key cultural and technological developments in cinema of the last 50 years, from the French New Wave (Nouvelle Vague) in the sixties to the rise of digital cinema at the end of the 20th century. Although the class considers a variety of industry practices, including the evolution of American cinema from classical to new Hollywood films, the emphasis is on the alternative film tradition that runs parallel to Hollywood, including neorealism (with its use of locations and amateurs and its hybrid of fiction and documentary), the rise of the notion of the \"auteur\" and the idea of film as a form of individual expression, \"art cinema\" and other modernist practices, new modes of political cinema, and alternative uses of the medium of digital video. Note: This course may be taken independently of Movements in World Cinema 1.", "countsTowards": "the certificate in Film Production and may count towards a bachelor's degree when take for credit.", "countsTowardsLink": "https://www.newschool.edu/public-engagement/film-production-certificate", "willLearn": "Familiarity with the poetics of silent cinema, the transition to sound, the role of genre, including the rise of documentary, animation, experimental modes, musical comedy and escapism, propaganda and social commitment.\n\nKnowledge of how international studio systems and economics play a role in film history. \n\nHow to effectively analyze and write about cinematic art forms.\n", "benefits": "This course engages the changing aesthetics, narrative styles, and ideologies in German, Russian, French, Italian, and Hollywood cinema of the first half of the 20th century. \n\nAn appreciation for and understanding of film history and the greater sociopolitical, global relations of cinema." } This course surveys the key cultural and technological developments in cinema of the last 50 years, from the French New Wave (Nouvelle Vague) in the sixties to the rise of digital cinema at the end of the 20th century. Although the class considers a variety of industry practices, including the evolution of American cinema from classical to new Hollywood films, the emphasis is on the alternative film tradition that runs parallel to Hollywood, including neorealism (with its use of locations and amateurs and its hybrid of fiction and documentary), the rise of the notion of the "auteur" and the idea of film as a form of individual expression, "art cinema" and other modernist practices, new modes of political cinema, and alternative uses of the medium of digital video. This semester, a special unit on Japanese New Wave and contemporary Japanese cinema will correspond with the program A Tribute to Donald Richie Part 2 presented by the Japan Society in March. Students will have an opportunity to view rare prints presented by guest curators, scholars, and filmmakers in attendance.

Jan 28 - May 13
Monday
6:00 - 7:50 PM
Spring 2019
CRN 4957
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